Drop-In Classes

Join us any Monday for a Drop-In Meditation or Ki-Aikido class. These enriching classes teach core principles of Mind-Body Meditation and Ki-Aikido, and require no prior meditation experience or martial arts training. Simply show up dressed for movement and enjoy the unique experience of mind-body oneness.

The classes are offered free of charge, and donations are welcomed and appreciated.

Please arrive 10 minutes prior to the start of your class.



Meditation
Monday 6:00 - 7:15

Whether you are new to meditation and would like to learn more, or if you are a seasoned practitioner looking to deepen your practice, please join us every Monday as we explore practices of mind-body meditation.

Tohei Sensei's approach to meditation focuses on the unification of mind and body: building the experience of oneness "on the mat" and learning to carry that experience into daily life. Each meditation class includes guided meditations, short presentations on basic aspects of meditation practice, and discussion. Drop in anytime!



Ki-Aikido
Monday 7:30 - 9:00

If you are interested in Aikido, non-violent arts of self-defense, or simply learning to move with coordination of mind and body, join us for our Drop-In Ki-Aikido class. No background or previous experience is required.

Ki-Aikido helps us bring the calm and peace we find in quiet reflection or meditation into the dynamic and sometimes stressful world of our daily lives. Every Ki-Aikido session begins with exercises to relax, focus, and coordinate mind and body. Through the class, we learn to carry this calm, focused attention into increasingly challenging situations. With regular practice, we learn to perform to the best of our ability even in all circumstances. Every Monday offers a stand-alone class. Feel free to join us anytime.

Monthly Drop-In Topics

  • November

    Drop-In Meditation: 
    Kiatsu
    Tohei Sensei developed Kiatsu as a way for us to practice oneness of mind and body while experiencing the healing power of nature. By opening to the Ki of the Universe and connecting with our partner, we support their natural flow of Ki, accelerating the healing process.

    Drop-In Aikido: Irimi
    Tohei sensei taught us that when we become one with the universe and practice its principles, others will follow us gladly. When we are faced with a conflict, we often become tense and cause separation. Practicing "Irimi" or "entering" teaches us to relax, experience oneness and move together with another, even in the face of extreme conflict.



    Resources:
    Read or listen to Curtis Sensei's lecture on Shokushu 16: Kiatsu
    Reading: Exercise 10: Presence the World Around You, pp 263 in "Living with the Wind at Your Back" by David Shaner.
    Reading: Chapters 1 & 2, pp 11-21 in "Kiatsu" by Koichi Tohei.



    Posted Oct 31, 2017, 8:41 AM by The Center for Mind-Body Oneness
  • October
    Drop-In Meditation: 
    Dynamic Meditation
    Soshu Tohei taught Ki Meditation as a way for us to directly feel the movement of the Ki of the Universe. By alternating our attention between the infinitely large and the infinitely small, we begin to realize the oneness and harmony of the universe we experience.

    Drop-In Aikido: Getting Off The Line (Respect your Partner's Ki)
    One of the most fundamental principles in Aikido is getting off the line of attack. In Aikido, we do not meet force with force. We do not "block" strikes. Instead, we respect the power that is coming toward us. If an attacker throws a punch, we respect the power of the punch by moving off the line and let the punch to continue unimpeded.


    Resources:
    Watch "Powers of Ten", a short film from the 1970s imagining a journey of "bigger, bigger, bigger" and "smaller, smaller, smaller" to the limits of scientific knowledge.
    Watch "Cosmic Eye", a contemporary remake of the classic "Powers of Ten."

    Watch Shaner Sensei demonstrate respecting another's power in this excerpt from the documentary The Asian and Abrahamic Religions: A Divine Encounter in America.
    The clip beginning at 1:34 is a great example of "getting off the line"

    Reading: Exercise 9: Dynamic Meditation, pp 214-222 in "Living with the Wind at Your Back" by David Shaner.

    Posted Sep 15, 2017, 2:07 PM by The Center for Mind-Body Oneness
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